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THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON GRATITUDE.

Alex Korb Ph.D. 2010
Adjunct Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences

Alex Korb is not your typical neuroscientist. The post-doctoral researcher is also a stand-up comic and former coach of the UCLA women’s Ultimate Frisbee club team. And he publishes the popular PreFrontal Nudity blog in Psychology Today, in which he explores “how the tendencies of your brain can both ruin and enrich your life.” So he knows something about what makes people happy. His book, The Upward Spiral: Using Neuroscience to Reverse the Course of Depression, One Small Change at a Time, is one of Amazon’s bestsellers on the subject. Korb is particularly interested in how gratitude, which he notes in the book activates the feel-good neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin, can be used to treat diseases of the mind. And you don’t even have to find anything to be grateful for; it’s enough to just make the effort. “It’s not finding gratitude that matters most,” Korb says, “it’s remembering to look in the first place.”

How will you give thanks?
UCLA Optimists

Alex Korb The Optimists - UCLA - Alex Korb

THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON GRATITUDE.

Alex Korb

Alex Korb is not your typical neuroscientist. The post-doctoral researcher is also a stand-up comic and former coach of the UCLA women’s Ultimate Frisbee club team. And he publishes the popular PreFrontal Nudity blog in Psychology Today, in which he explores “how the tendencies of your brain can both ruin and enrich your life.” So he knows something about what makes people happy. His book, The Upward Spiral: Using Neuroscience to Reverse the Course of Depression, One Small Change at a Time, is one of Amazon’s bestsellers on the subject. Korb is particularly interested in how gratitude, which he notes in the book activates the feel-good neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin, can be used to treat diseases of the mind. And you don’t even have to find anything to be grateful for; it’s enough to just make the effort. “It’s not finding gratitude that matters most,” Korb says, “it’s remembering to look in the first place.”

How will you give thanks?